Norms and Values in the European Migration and Refugee Crisis
News

Our study “Talking of Values: Understanding the Normative Discourse of EU Migration Policy” is now published online – see here. For first impressions, take a look at Angeliki Dimitriadi’s post on our blog.

Value Landscape
 

The NoVaMigra Value Landscape is a tool to visualize aspects of NoVaMigra’s research on value discourses in the context of migration and integration policies in Europe, both at EU and at member state level. Starting in September 2019, it will continuously evolve throughout the project, incorporating new research findings and enabling their comparison and contrast.

The Value Landscape starts with a visualization of some of the findings in NoVaMigra’s Work Package 3: Value Agents in Public and Civil Society Institutions. As part of our research, we analysed discours-es on values in civic integration activities directed at immigrants in five EU member states – France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, and Sweden. We wanted to know what values where emphasized as particularly important vis-à-vis immigrants, but also how these values were interpreted and justified. The interactive Value Landscape makes our results assessable and comparable.

Click on the image below to start the interactive Value Landscape. For more information on our methodology and key findings, download the file below.




How to Use the NoVaMigra Value Landscape

Click on “Value Discourses in Civic Integration in the EU” to get to the main view of the Value Landscape (see Figure 1).

The overview allows you to see the variety of values cited in the integration documents we analysed. The boxes’ size indicates how frequently a specific value was mentioned across the five member states analysed. You will see the exact number of places where a specific value was mentioned by hoovering your mouse over the value box in question. Additionally, you may filter the values by place using the box in the upper right corner of the sheet.

NoVaMigra’s Value Landscape is interactive. By clicking on a value box, you will be able to access more detailed information on a specific value. The Value Landscape’s second layer allows you to see in which countries a selected value was promoted (see Figure 2).

Proceeding to click on a value-country combination will bring you to the third layer of the Value Landscape, which allows you to access and analyse the value descriptions as given in the integration documents we analyzed (see Figure 3). For each value and document, we provided the relevant text passages. Where documents were only available in a member state’s official language, we made available both an English translation and the original text.

In addition to this, the Value Landscape provides some analysis of the vocabulary used to introduce and justify a given value. While the documents’ focus is on explaining what the value means and what con-sequences it might have for what is expected from immigrants, most documents also make some

effort to explain why a specific value is important in the society in question in the first place. In doing so, most documents reference institutions and conventions beyond the value as such: a nation’s specif-ic history, a national constitution, political or legal European commitments, a rights declaration, or a society’s particular cultural tradition. For each quote, we made explicit the value’s specific reference point.

The Value Landscape also tracks if a more specific normative concept is used to describe the value in question. Some of the civic integration documents refer to a society’s basic normative commitments as “principles”, while others call them “values” explicitly. Most of the time, however, neither of the terms is used.

The Value Landscape features a fourth layer: a detailed, filterable overview of all value interpretations we encountered in the material (see Figure 4). The overview can be filtered according to three criteria: Place Level (EU, National, Regional), Reference Point (Constitutional text, European law and politics, Historical developments, Religious and cultural tradition, Rights declaration, Not explicit) and Norma-tive Vocabulary (Principle, Value, Not explicit).

For more information on our methodology and key findings, follow the download link below.

Download file (615.22 kB)

 




 
News

Our study “Talking of Values: Understanding the Normative Discourse of EU Migration Policy” is now published online – see here. For first impressions, take a look at Angeliki Dimitriadi’s post on our blog.

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